Note: as of catalog publication in April, the program described below has been approved by the Board of Visitors and sent to the State Council of Higher Education in Virginia for consideration as a new degree program.  The university cannot accept applications or enroll students in this program until SCHEV approval has been granted.

Good nutrition is essential for health and well-being, but notable deficiencies exist in nutrition knowledge and the quality of the diets of adults and children in the US and worldwide. The high rates of overweight and obesity, rising household food insecurity, and a rapidly changing food environment, accompanied by increased consumer interest in healthful eating inspired the development of this program which is focused on improving the health and nutritional status of local, national, and global populations. This underscores our commitment to creating a more just, free, and prosperous world, as well-nourished populations tend to thrive and achieve greater productivity.

The program is unique and innovative by drawing from courses and skills outside traditional nutrition undergraduate programs which focus on the physiological and biological aspects of foods and nutrients. In addition to those traditional courses, we offer innovative courses such as Food Systems, Experimental Foods, Fundamentals of Cooking and Nutrition Policy that will allow students to apply their skills and knowledge to developing programs, policy, and interventions that impact nutrition and nutrition solutions. The core courses include all the basic components within the discipline of nutrition with the purpose to train students to assess, evaluate, and intervene in the most current and relevant nutrition issues. It is guided by the competency guidelines of the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND), the accrediting agency for education programs preparing students for careers in nutrition, to ensure that enrolled students acquire a thorough and valuable set of knowledge and skills.

The curriculum includes three optional concentrations that may be taken in place of Nutrition Electives:

Food Systems Concentration

The Food Systems concentration will provide students with the knowledge and skills to understand how components of the food system affect the health of a community (e.g., nutrition, food security, inequity, agriculture, food safety). Students will examine the interrelationships within national and global food systems and their influence on such outcomes as the obesity epidemic, food security, and the environmental impact of agriculture.

Global Nutrition and Food Security Concentration

The Global Nutrition and Food Security concentration will provide our students with the knowledge and tools to prepare them for careers in food security and safety, as well as a comprehensive skill set to evaluate nutritional status and determinants across various populations worldwide. While undernutrition is predominant in low-income nations, overnutrition is more common in high-income countries and populations. These are issues of growing concern to government agencies, multilateral organizations and non-governmental organizations. Despite longstanding efforts, it is estimated that up to one billion people across the globe are hungry and food insecure in both developing and industrialized countries, including the United States.

Pre-Dietetics Concentration

The Pre-Dietetics concentration will serve as preparation for students who wish to pursue the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) credential, and includes medicine-oriented courses as well as food service courses, both competencies required by ACEND, to assure a smooth pathway towards an MS/RDN program and dietetic internship.

Note: as of catalog publication in April, the program described below has been approved by the Board of Visitors and sent to the State Council of Higher Education in Virginia for consideration as a new degree program.  The university cannot accept applications or enroll students in this program until SCHEV approval has been granted.

Policies

For policies governing all undergraduate degrees, see AP.5 Undergraduate Policies.

Advising

Each student is assigned an academic advisor who is a faculty member within their academic department or a professional academic advisor within the Office of Student Affairs (OSA). Academic advisor assignments are listed on the CHHS website, and students are expected to meet with their advisor regularly (at least once each semester) to seek advice about academic schedules and program plans. Students also should meet with their advisor if they are experiencing academic difficulty.

Student Responsibilities

All students are responsible for knowing the requirements of their major as specified in the university catalog for their catalog year; academic deadlines outlined in the semester academic calendar; and university policies and procedures as stated in the catalog.

Students also should run their own degree-evaluation to identify graduation requirements and progress towards their degree. While academic advisors can give advice to students, students are responsible for the academic planning decisions they make. Academic advisors cannot be held responsible for mistakes made by students in selecting courses that may not count toward their degree and thus delay a desired graduation date.

Minimum Grade Requirement

A minimum grade of C must be obtained in all major requirements, including concentration coursework.

Writing Intensive Requirement

The university requires all students to complete at least one course designated "writing intensive" within the major. Students majoring in nutrition fulfill this requirement by successfully completing NUTR 326 Food Systems.

Banner Code: HH-BS-NUTR

Note: as of catalog publication in April, the program described below has been approved by the Board of Visitors and sent to the State Council of Higher Education in Virginia for consideration as a new degree program.  The university cannot accept applications or enroll students in this program until SCHEV approval has been granted.

Degree Requirements

Total credits: 120

Students must fulfill all requirements for bachelor's degrees, including the Mason Core requirements.

Mason Core Requirements

Foundation Requirements
Written Communication
ENGH 100Composition for Multilingual Writers (Mason Core)3
or ENGH 101 Composition (Mason Core)
Oral Communication
Any Mason Core Oral Communication course3
Quantitative Reasoning
STAT 250Introductory Statistics I (Mason Core)3
Information Technology
Any Mason Core Information Technology course3
Exploration Requirements
Arts
Any Mason Core Arts course3
Global Understanding
GCH 205Global Health (Mason Core)3
Literature
Any Mason Core Literature course3
Natural Science
BIOL 213Cell Structure and Function (Mason Core)4
NUTR 295Introduction to Nutrition (Mason Core)3
Social and Behavioral Science
Any Mason Core Social and Behavioral Science course3
Western Civilization/World History
Any Mason Core Western Civilization/World History course3
Integration Requirement
Written Communication
ENGH 302Advanced Composition (Mason Core)3
Writing-Intensive 1
Capstone
NUTR 495Nutrition and Food Studies Capstone3
Total Credits40

Core Courses

BIOL 425Human Physiology3
BIOL 483General Biochemistry4
or CHEM 463 General Biochemistry I
CHEM 211General Chemistry I (Mason Core)3
CHEM 212General Chemistry II (Mason Core)3
CHEM 213General Chemistry Laboratory I (Mason Core)1
CHEM 214General Chemistry Laboratory II (Mason Core)1
CHEM 313Organic Chemistry I3
GCH 300Introduction to Public Health3
GCH 412Fundamentals of Epidemiology3
NUTR 312Experimental Foods3
NUTR 313Experimental Foods Lab1
NUTR 315Fundamentals of Cooking3
NUTR 326Food Systems3
NUTR 330Food Composition3
NUTR 383Taste and Place3
NUTR 420Strategies for Nutrition Education3
NUTR 421Community Nutrition3
NUTR 422Nutrition throughout the Life Cycle3
NUTR 423Nutrition and Chronic Illnesses3
NUTR 440Nutrition Policy3
NUTR 442Advanced Nutrition I3
NUTR 444Advanced Nutrition II3
NUTR 451Nutrition Assessment3
Total Credits64

Restricted Electives

Select one of the following:1
Internship and Career Readiness
Special Topics
Dimensions of Well-Being
College to Career
College to Graduate School
Critical Decisions in Postgraduate Transitions
RS: Students as Scholars Individualized Scholarly Experience
RS: Undergraduate Research Scholars Program Seminar
Other courses as approved by director
Total Credits1

Nutrition Electives

Students may select 15 credits of additional 300-400 level courses from any of the following prefixes: ANTH, COMM, EDUC, INTS, GCH, GGS, HAP, HEAL, KINE, NUTR, PSYC, TOUR, RHBS, SOCW or other courses as approved by the director.

Concentration Areas

In lieu of the Nutrition Electives, students may choose a concentration area.

Concentration in Food Systems (FOOD)

The Food Systems concentration will provide students with the knowledge and skills to understand how components of the food system affect the health of the community (e.g. nutrition, food security, inequity, agriculture, and food safety). Students will examine the interrelationships within national and global food systems and their influence on such outcomes as the obesity epidemic, food security, and the environmental impact of agriculture.

Required Courses
NUTR 318Global Nutrition and Food Security3
INTS 371Food Systems and Policy (Mason Core)3
Electives
Select 9 credits from the following:9
Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering
Urban Ecosystems and Processes
Sustainable Food Systems
Principles of Marketing
Introduction to Food Safety and Defense
Urban Agriculture
Global Environmental Ethics (Mason Core)
Ethics and Economics
Other courses as approved by director
Total Credits15

Concentration in Food Security and Global Nutrition (FSGN)

The Food Security and Global Nutrition concentration will provide students with the knowledge and tools to prepare them for careers in food security, as well as a comprehensive skill set to evaluate nutritional status and determinants across various populations worldwide. While undernutrition is predominant in low-income nations, overnutrition is more common in high-income countries and populations. These are issues of growing concern to government agencies, multilateral organizations, and non-government organizations. Despite longstanding efforts, it is estimated that up to one billion people across the globe are hungry and food insecure in both developing and industrialized countries, including the United States.

Required Courses
NUTR 318Global Nutrition and Food Security3
NUTR 410Introduction to Food Safety and Defense3
Electives
Select 9 credits from the following:9
Food and Human Evolution
Food and Culture
Environmental Engineering around the World (Mason Core)
Conflict and Our World (Mason Core)
International Economic Policy
Human Geography (Mason Core)
Introduction to Geoinformation Technologies
Population Geography (Mason Core)
Urban Agriculture
Any FRLN prefix course
Other courses as approved by director
Total Credits15

Concentration in Pre-Dietetics (PRDI)

The Pre-Dietetics concentration will serve as a preparation for students who wish to pursue the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) credential, and includes medicine-oriented courses as well as food service courses, both competencies required by Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND), to assure a smooth pathway towards an MS/RDN program and dietetic internship.

Required Courses
HAP 201Health Professions Careers3
NUTR 410Introduction to Food Safety and Defense3
TOUR 230Introduction to Hospitality Management3
TOUR 310Food and Beverage Management3
Electives
Select 3 credits from the following:3
Introductory Microbiology
Relational Communication Theory
Contemporary Microeconomic Principles (Mason Core)
Medical Terminology
Basic Concepts in Psychology (Mason Core)
Introductory Sociology (Mason Core)
Other courses as approved by director
Total Credits15