The BA in English offers students the opportunity to study literature, creative writing, film and media studies, writing and rhetoric, linguistics, folklore and mythology, and cultural studies. Of these seven concentrations, students pursue one or two that best match their interests and career objectives. Students are encouraged to pursue internships related to their concentrations and receive faculty mentorship throughout that process. In fact, English classes are kept small so faculty members may provide students with personalized attention. Students write in a range of traditional and digital forms and in a variety of contexts; student work culminates in a research project written for the major capstone course in their concentration. For students who want to challenge themselves even further, there is an Honors Program in English, which includes a thesis option, as well as other opportunities to pursue advanced research or creative projects; for those who want to become teachers, there is a bachelor’s/accelerated master’s program that English offers in conjunction with the College of Education and Human Development.

Policies

Students pursuing this degree must complete 36 credits in English/Linguistics beyond ENGH 300 (not including ENGH 302) with a minimum GPA of 2.00. At least 12 credits (including the capstone requirement) must be at the 400 level.

For policies governing all undergraduate degrees, see AP.5 Undergraduate Policies.

Banner Code: LA-BA-ENGL

Degree Requirements

Total credits: minimum 120

Students should be aware of the specific policies associated with this program, located on the Admissions & Policies tab.

300-level courses in English and linguistics teach the foundational principles for a field of study, include courses of broad scope, and provide an introduction to a genre, literary period, or methodology.

400-level courses in English and linguistics provide an in-depth approach to a field of study, a single genre, literary period, or methodology. They include special topics classes and English honors classes. Some 400 level courses require ENGH 305 Dimensions of Writing and Literature as a prerequisite.

Students choose at least one and no more than two of seven concentrations.

Students should consult with an English Department advisor to learn ways in which the Mason Core requirements can also satisfy college-level requirements for the English major.

Core Courses in the Major

Required Courses

Threshold Course
ENGH 301The Fields of English3
Field Introduction Courses
ENGH 305Dimensions of Writing and Literature3
Select 3 credits from the following: 13
General Linguistics (Mason Core)
Folklore and Folklife
Introduction to Cultural Studies
Introduction to Film (Mason Core)
Introduction to Writing and Rhetoric
Introduction to Creative Writing (Mason Core)
Theory Course
ENGH 308Theory and Inquiry3
Capstone Course
Select 3 credits from the following:3
RS: Honors Thesis Writing Seminar (Mason Core)
RS: Topics in Folklore Research (Mason Core)
RS: Topics in Literary Research (Mason Core)
RS: Topics in Film/Media History (Mason Core)
RS: Writing Ethnography (Mason Core)
RS: Writing Nonfiction for Publication (Mason Core)
Total Credits15
1

For many students this requirement will be met within the concentration. Those students will complete an additional 3 credit ENGH course above ENGH 302 Advanced Composition (Mason Core).

English Department Requirements

Courses taken to fulfill this requirement may simultaneously satisfy a concentration. Special topics courses, when relevant, may be used to fulfill this requirement with the prior written approval of the department.

Literature before 1800
Select 3 credits from the following:3
Literature of the Middle Ages
English Poetry and Prose of the 16th Century
Shakespeare
Shakespeare: Special Topics
English Renaissance Drama
English Poetry and Prose of the 17th Century
Augustan Age: 1660-1745
Age of Sensibility: 1745-1800
Restoration and 18th Century Drama
British Novel of the 18th Century
Early American Literature
Topics in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
Chaucer
Spenser
Milton
Literature before 1915
Select 3 credits from courses listed above and the following:3
British Poetry of the Romantic Period
Prose and Poetry of the Victorian Period
British Novel of the 19th Century
Literature of the American Renaissance
Development of the American Novel to 1914
Beginnings of African American Literature Through 1865
African American Literature: Reconstruction to 1903
Continental Fiction, 1770-1880
Continental Fiction, 1880-1950
Minority, Folkloric, or Popular Literary and Cultural Traditions
Select 3 credits from the following:3
Topics: Women and Literature
Folklore and Folklife
Popular Culture
Beginnings of African American Literature Through 1865
African American Literature: Reconstruction to 1903
African American Literature Through 1946
Contemporary African American Literature
Topics in Ethnic American Literature
Global Voices (Mason Core)
The Idea of a World Literature (Mason Core)
World Literatures in English
Topics in Folklore Studies
Folklore of the Spirit World
Folk Arts and Folk Artists
Ethnicity and Migration in Folklore
RS: Topics in Folklore Research (Mason Core)
Topics in Popular Literature
Science Fiction
Critical Study of Children's Literature
Total Credits9

Electives  in the Major

Students must take 0-12 elective credits in the major as needed to meet the 36-credit requirement.0-12
Total Credits0-12

Concentrations in the Major

Students choose one and no more than two concentrations. Special topics courses may be used to fulfill the requirements for a concentration when so designated by department.

Concentration in Creative Writing (CW)

Select four courses from the following:12
Digital Creative Writing
Poetry Writing
Fiction Writing
Creative Nonfiction Writing
Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop
Advanced Workshop in Nonfiction
Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop
Topics in Creative Writing
Total Credits12

Concentration in Cultural Studies (CULT)

Select four courses from the following:12
Theory and Inquiry
Topics: Women and Literature
Folklore and Folklife
Introduction to Cultural Studies
Popular Culture
Beginnings of African American Literature Through 1865
African American Literature: Reconstruction to 1903
African American Literature Through 1946
Contemporary African American Literature
Topics in Ethnic American Literature
Global Voices (Mason Core)
Introduction to Film (Mason Core)
Topics in Folklore Studies
Folklore of the Spirit World
Folk Arts and Folk Artists
Ethnicity and Migration in Folklore
Cultural Constructions of Sexualities
Topics in Popular Literature
Critical Study of Children's Literature
Topics in Film/Media Studies
May include one course from outside the English Department chosen from:
Topics in Communication and Gender
Globalization and Culture
Psychology of Gender
Contemporary Gender Relations
Current Issues in Women and Gender Studies
Theoretical Perspectives in Women and Gender Studies
Total Credits12

Concentration in Film and Media Studies (FILM)

Select four courses from the following:12
Introduction to Cultural Studies
Popular Culture (with department approval)
Global Voices (Mason Core) (with department approval)
Introduction to Documentary (Mason Core)
Television Studies (Mason Core)
Introduction to Film (Mason Core)
Film and Video Forms
Cultural Constructions of Sexualities (with department approval)
RS: Topics in Film/Media History (Mason Core)
Topics in Film/Media Theory
Topics in Film/Media Studies
May include one course from outside the English Department chosen from:
Cyberpunk
Small Group Communication
Gender, Race, and Class in the Media
Visual Communication
Media Criticism
Topics in Communication and Gender
The History of World Cinema (Mason Core)
Global Horror Film (Mason Core)
Ethics of Film and Video (Mason Core)
French and Francophone Cinema
Topics in World Cinema (Mason Core)
Japanese Cinema
Music in Motion Pictures (Mason Core)
Topics in (Post) Soviet Film
Total Credits12

Concentration in Folklore and Mythology (FOLK)

Select 6 credits in folklore and mythology from the following:6
Folklore and Folklife
Topics in Myth and Literature
Topics in Folklore Studies
Folklore of the Spirit World
Folk Arts and Folk Artists
Ethnicity and Migration in Folklore
RS: Topics in Folklore Research (Mason Core)
Internship
RS: Writing Ethnography (Mason Core)
Topics in Folklore Studies
May include one course from outside the English Department chosen from:
Qualitative Methods: Nonstatistical Approaches in Culture and Social Research
Greek and Roman Epic (Mason Core)
Select up to 6 credits related to folklore and mythology from the following:6
Introduction to Cultural Studies
Literature of the Middle Ages
Shakespeare
Shakespeare: Special Topics
British and Irish Drama after 1900
Beginnings of African American Literature Through 1865
African American Literature: Reconstruction to 1903
African American Literature Through 1946
Contemporary African American Literature
Global Voices (Mason Core)
Chaucer
Spenser
Milton
May include one course from outside the English Department chosen from:
Native North Americans
Peoples and Cultures of Latin America (Mason Core)
Peoples and Cultures of Island Asia (Mason Core)
Ancient Mesoamerica (Mason Core)
Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (Mason Core)
Myth, Magic, and Mind (Mason Core)
Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Globalization (Mason Core)
Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Near East (Mason Core)
Greek Art and Archaeology (Mason Core)
Roman Art and Archaeology (Mason Core)
Early Renaissance Art in Italy, 1300-1500 (Mason Core)
High Renaissance Art in Italy, 1480-1570 (Mason Core)
Northern Baroque Art, 1600-1750 (Mason Core)
Arts of India (Mason Core)
Arts of Southeast Asia (Mason Core)
Arts of China (Mason Core)
Arts of Japan (Mason Core)
Total Credits12

Concentration in Linguistics (LING)

LING 306General Linguistics (Mason Core)3
Select 9 credits from the following:9
English Grammar
Introduction to Sociolinguistics
First Language Acquisition
Semantics and Pragmatics
Syntax I
Generative Phonology
Independent Study
Field Work in Applied Linguistics
Applied Linguistics: Teaching English as a Second Language
English Phonetics
Psycholinguistics
Second Language Acquisition
Total Credits12

Concentration in Literature (LIT)

When relevant, ENGH 400 Honors Seminar, ENGH 401 RS: Honors Thesis Writing Seminar (Mason Core), and ENGH 402 Honors Independent Study may be applied to this concentration.

Select four courses from the following:12
Topics: Literary Surveys
Topics in Literature
Topics: Women and Literature
Literature of the Middle Ages
English Poetry and Prose of the 16th Century
Shakespeare
Shakespeare: Special Topics
English Renaissance Drama
English Poetry and Prose of the 17th Century
Augustan Age: 1660-1745
Age of Sensibility: 1745-1800
Restoration and 18th Century Drama
British Novel of the 18th Century
British Poetry of the Romantic Period
Prose and Poetry of the Victorian Period
British Novel of the 19th Century
British Poetry after 1900
British Novel after 1900
British and Irish Drama after 1900
Early American Literature
Literature of the American Renaissance
Development of the American Novel to 1914
Development of the American Novel since 1914
American Drama of the 20th Century
American Poetry of the 20th Century
Beginnings of African American Literature Through 1865
African American Literature: Reconstruction to 1903
African American Literature Through 1946
Contemporary African American Literature
Topics in Ethnic American Literature
Recent American Fiction
Recent American Poetry
Continental Fiction, 1770-1880
Continental Fiction, 1880-1950
Global Voices (Mason Core) (when topic is relevant, with departmental approval)
The Idea of a World Literature (Mason Core)
World Literatures in English
Modern Drama
Topics in Criticism (when topic is relevant, with departmental approval)
Literary Modes
Topics in Popular Literature
Topics in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
Chaucer
Spenser
Milton
Topics: British Literary Periods
Topics: British Authors
Topics: American Authors
Topics: American Literary Periods
Science Fiction
Critical Study of Children's Literature
Topics in Fiction
Topics in Poetry
Topics in Drama
Topics in Literary Nonfiction
RS: Topics in Literary Research (Mason Core)
Total Credits12

Concentration in Writing and Rhetoric (WRTR)

Select four courses from the following:12
Web Authoring and Design
Rhetoric and New Media
Introduction to Writing and Rhetoric
Writing Nonfiction Genres
Editing for Audience, Style, and Voice
Professional and Technical Writing
Creative Nonfiction Writing
Internship
Technical Editing
RS: Writing Ethnography (Mason Core)
Document Design
RS: Writing Nonfiction for Publication (Mason Core)
Topics in Writing and Rhetoric
Proposal Writing and Development
Total Credits12

Writing Intensive Requirement

The university requires all students to complete at least one course designated "writing intensive" in their majors at the 300 level or above. Students majoring in English fulfill this requirement by successfully completing:

ENGH 305Dimensions of Writing and Literature3
Total Credits3

Upper Level Courses

Students seeking a bachelor’s degree must apply at least 45 credits of upper-level courses (numbered 300 or above) toward graduation requirements.

College Level Requirements for the BA Degree

In addition to the Mason Core program, students pursuing a BA degree must complete the coursework below. Except where expressly prohibited, a course used to fulfill a college level requirement may also be used simultaneously to satisfy other requirements (Mason Core requirements or requirements for the major).

Philosophy or Religious Studies
Select 3 credits from the following:3
1

Note that the following courses may not be used to fulfill this requirement:

  • PHIL 323 Classical Western Political Theory 
  • PHIL 324 Modern Western Political Theory 
  • PHIL 327 Contemporary Western Political Theory 
  • PHIL 393 Humanities College to Career 
  • PHIL 460 Senior Seminar in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics


Additionally, PHIL 253 Philosophy and Literature (Mason Core) and RELI 235 Religion and Literature (Mason Core) cannot be used to fulfill both the philosophy/religious studies requirement and the Mason Core literature requirement.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
Select 3 credits of social and behavioral sciences from the following (additional to the Mason Core social and behavioral sciences requirement) 13
ANTH
CRIM
ECON
GOVT
HIST 2
LING
PSYC
SOCI
Or choose from the following GGS courses:
Major World Regions (Mason Core)
Human Geography (Mason Core)
Introduction to Geoinformation Technologies
Political Geography
Geography of Resource Conservation (Mason Core)
Population Geography (Mason Core)
Economic Geography
Urban Geography
Geography of the United States
Geography of Latin America
Geography of Europe
Geography of North Africa and the Middle East
Geography of the Soviet Succession States
Structures in Urban Governance and Planning
Geography of Virginia
1

The two courses used to fulfill the combined college and Mason Core requirements must be from different disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences. 

2

HIST 100 History of Western Civilization (Mason Core) and HIST 125 Introduction to World History (Mason Core) may not be used to fulfill this requirement.

Foreign Language
Intermediate-level proficiency in one foreign language, fulfilled by: 1
Or achieving a satisfactory score on an approved proficiency test
Or completing the following ASL three course sequence:
American Sign Language (ASL) I
American Sign Language (ASL) II
American Sign Language (ASL) III
1

Students who are already proficient in a second language may be eligible for a waiver of this requirement. Additional information on waivers can be found at the Office of Undergraduate Academic Affairs.

Non-Western Culture

Select 3 credits of an approved course in the study of a non-Western culture (additional to the Mason Core requirement in global understanding)

Select 3 credits (additional to Mason Core Global Understanding requirement) 1
ANTH 114Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (Mason Core)3
ANTH 300Civilizations3
ANTH 301Native North Americans3
ANTH 302Peoples and Cultures of Latin America (Mason Core)3
ANTH 303Peoples and Cultures of the Andes3
ANTH 306Peoples and Cultures of Island Asia (Mason Core)3
ANTH 307Ancient Mesoamerica (Mason Core)3
ANTH 308Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (Mason Core)3
ANTH 309Peoples and Cultures of India (Mason Core)3
ANTH 313Myth, Magic, and Mind (Mason Core)3
ANTH 314Zombies3
ANTH 316Peoples and Cultures of the Caribbean (Mason Core)3
ANTH 323Digging and Dealing in the Dead: Ethics in Archaeology3
ANTH 330Peoples and Cultures of Selected Regions: Non-Western3
ANTH 332Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Globalization (Mason Core)3
ANTH 381Medical Anthropology3
ANTH 383Cities of the Global South3
ANTH 396Issues in Anthropology: Social Sciences (Mason Core)3
ARAB 360Topics in Arabic Cultural Production3
ARAB 420Survey of Arabic Literature3
ARAB 440Topics in Arabic Religious Thought and Texts (Mason Core)3
ARTH 203Survey of Asian Art (Mason Core)3
ARTH 204Survey of Latin American Art (Mason Core)3
ARTH 206Survey of African Art (Mason Core)3
ARTH 318Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt3
ARTH 319Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Near East (Mason Core)3
ARTH 320Art of the Islamic World (Mason Core)3
ARTH 382Arts of India (Mason Core)3
ARTH 383Arts of Southeast Asia (Mason Core)3
ARTH 384Arts of China (Mason Core)3
ARTH 385Arts of Japan (Mason Core)3
ARTH 386The Silk Road (Mason Core)3
ARTH 482RS: Advanced Studies in Asian Art3
CHIN 318Introduction to Classical Chinese (Mason Core)3
CHIN 320Contemporary Chinese Film3
CHIN 325Major Chinese Writers (Mason Core)3
DANC 118World Dance (Mason Core)3
ECON 361Economic Development of Latin America (Mason Core)3
ECON 362African Economic Development (Mason Core)3
FREN 451Topics in Sub-Saharan Francophone Literature and Culture3
FREN 454Topics in Caribbean Francophone Literature and Culture3
GGS 101Major World Regions (Mason Core)3
GGS 316Geography of Latin America3
GGS 325Geography of North Africa and the Middle East3
GGS 330Geography of the Soviet Succession States3
GGS 399Select Topics in GGS3
GOVT 328Non-Western Political Theory3
GOVT 332Government and Politics of the Middle East and North Africa3
GOVT 333Government and Politics of Asia3
GOVT 340Central Asian Politics3
GOVT 341Chinese Foreign Policy3
GOVT 345Islam and Politics3
GOVT 432Political Change and Social Development in Sub-Saharan Africa3
GOVT 433Political Economy of East Asia3
HIST 251Survey of East Asian History (Mason Core)3
HIST 252Survey of East Asian History (Mason Core)3
HIST 261Survey of African History (Mason Core)3
HIST 262Survey of African History (Mason Core)3
HIST 271Survey of Latin American History (Mason Core)3
HIST 272Survey of Latin American History (Mason Core)3
HIST 281Survey of Middle Eastern Civilization (Mason Core)3
HIST 282Survey of Middle Eastern Civilization (Mason Core)3
HIST 326Stalinism3
HIST 327The Soviet Union and Russia Since World War II3
HIST 328Rise of Russia (Mason Core)3
HIST 329Modern Russia and the Soviet Union (Mason Core)3
HIST 353History of Traditional China3
HIST 354Modern China3
HIST 356Modern Japan (Mason Core)3
HIST 357Postwar Japan (Mason Core)3
HIST 358Post-1949 China (Mason Core)3
HIST 360History of South Africa (Mason Core)3
HIST 364Revolution and Radical Politics in Latin America (Mason Core)3
HIST 365Conquest and Colonization in Latin America (Mason Core)3
HIST 366Comparative Slavery3
HIST 367History, Fiction, and Film in Latin America3
HIST 387Topics in Global History (Mason Core)3-6
HIST 426The Russian Revolution3
HIST 460Modern Iran (Mason Core)3
HIST 461Arab-Israeli Conflict3
HIST 462Women in Islamic Society (Mason Core)3
HIST 465The Middle East in the 20th Century3
JAPA 310Japanese Culture in a Global World (Mason Core)3
JAPA 340Topics in Japanese Literature (Mason Core)3
KORE 320Korean Popular Culture in a Global World3
MUSI 103Musics of the World (Mason Core)3
RELI 211Religions of the West (Mason Core)3
RELI 212Religions of Asia (Mason Core)3
RELI 240Death and the Afterlife in World Religions3
RELI 272Islam3
RELI 313Hinduism (Mason Core)3
RELI 314Chinese Philosophies and Religious Traditions3
RELI 315Buddhism (Mason Core)3
RELI 337Mysticism: East and West3
RELI 365Muhammad: Life and Legacy3
RELI 374Islamic Thought (Mason Core)3
RELI 375Qur'an and Hadith3
RELI 379Islamic Law, Society, and Ethics3
RELI 387Islam, Democracy, and Human Rights3
RELI 490Comparative Study of Religions (Mason Core)3
RUSS 353Russian Civilization (Mason Core)3
RUSS 354Contemporary Post-Soviet Life (Mason Core)3
1

A course used to fulfill the Mason Core global understanding requirement may not be simultaneously used to satisfy this college-level requirement. A course used to fulfill this requirement may be used simultaneously to fulfill any other requirements (Mason Core requirements, college-level requirements, or requirements for the major). Additional information on waivers can be found at the Office of Undergraduate Academic Affairs.

Mason Core

Note: Some Mason Core requirements may already be fulfilled by the major requirements listed above. Students are strongly encouraged to consult their advisors to ensure they fulfill all remaining Mason Core requirements.

Foundation Requirements
Written Communication6
Oral Communication3
Quantitative Reasoning3
Information Technology3-7
Core Requirements
Arts3
Global Understanding3
Literature3
Natural Science7
Social and Behavioral Sciences3
Western Civilization/World History3
Synthesis/Capstone Requirement 1
Synthesis/Capstone3
Total Credits40
1

minimum 3 credits

Additional Elective Courses

Any remaining credits may be completed with elective courses to bring the degree total to 120.

Honors in the Major

Highly qualified students in either the BA in English or the BFA in creative writing programs may pursue advanced work leading to graduation with honors in the major. To graduate with honors in the major, students must complete a two-course honors sequence and receive a minimum GPA of 3.50 in all courses counted toward the major and, separately, a minimum GPA of 3.50 in their honors courses. Honors courses may simultaneously satisfy concentration and distribution requirements in the major.

Students satisfy the honors course sequence by taking one of the following:

  • Two sections of ENGH 400 Honors Seminar 
  • ENGH 400 Honors Seminar and ENGH 401 RS: Honors Thesis Writing Seminar (Mason Core)
  • ENGH 400 Honors Seminar and writing a creative honors thesis in ENGH 402 Honors Independent Study (for students in the creative writing concentration) or ENGH 495 Capstone and Thesis (Mason Core)
  • ENGH 402 Honors Independent Study in conjunction with an advanced course in nonfiction writing and completing a nonfiction thesis as part of ENGH 401 RS: Honors Thesis Writing Seminar (Mason Core) (for students in the nonfiction concentration)

Students interested in pursuing honors in the major should consult the English Department for more information.

The accelerated master's programs in the list below specify the BA in English as a feeder degree for their programs. It is important to note, however, that many accelerated master's programs are available for any bachelor's degree at Mason, including this one. See the full list of master's degrees with accelerated programs at George Mason. In addition, as a student with a BA in English you may be particularly interested in the accelerated MA in English with a concentration in linguistics.

English, BA or Creative Writing, BFA/Curriculum and Instruction, Accelerated MEd (Secondary Education English concentration)

Overview

Highly-qualified Mason undergraduates may be admitted to the bachelor's/accelerated master's option and obtain both a BA in English or a BFA in Creative Writing and an MEd in Curriculum and Instruction (concentration in secondary education English) in an accelerated time-frame after satisfactory completion of 149 credits. See AP.6.7 Bachelor's/Accelerated Master's Degree for policies related to this program.

This accelerated option is offered jointly by the Department of English and the Graduate School of Education.

Students in an accelerated degree program must fulfill all university requirements for the master's degree. For policies governing all graduate degrees, see AP.6 Graduate Policies.

Application Requirements

Applicants to all graduate programs at George Mason University must meet the admission standards and application requirements for graduate study as specified in Graduate Admissions Policies. For information specific to this accelerated master's program, see Application Requirements and Deadlines.

Accelerated Option Requirements

Students complete the following courses in their senior year:

Senior
Fall SemesterCreditsSpring SemesterCredits
EDCI 5693EDCI 6693
EDUC 6723EDRD 6193
 6 6
Total Credits 12

While undergraduate students, accelerated master's students are able to apply two of the courses listed above to both the bachelor's and master's degrees. These courses are considered advanced standing for the MEd. A minimum grade of B must be earned to be eligible to count as advanced standing. The other two courses are taken as reserve graduate credit and do not apply to the undergraduate degree. Early in their final undergraduate semester, students must submit the Bachelor's/Accelerated Master's Transition Form to the CEHD Admissions Office and specify which of the four courses are to be designated as advanced standing and reserve graduate credit.

Bachelor's Degree (selected)/Interdisciplinary Studies, Accelerated MAIS (Women and Gender Studies Concentration)

Overview

Highly-qualified undergraduates in select majors may apply to the accelerated master's degree in interdisciplinary studies with a concentration in women and gender studies. If accepted, and depending on their undergraduate major, students will be able to earn a bachelor's degree in their chosen major and a master's degree in interdisciplinary studies with a concentration in women and gender studies after satisfactory completion of 150 credits, sometime within five years.

For more detailed information, see AP.6.7 Bachelor's/Accelerated Master's Degrees. For policies governing all graduate degrees, see AP.6 Graduate Policies.

Selected Majors

AnthropologySociologyEnglishHistoryPhilosophyConflict Analysis and ResolutionPsychologyGovernment and International Politics, and Communication.

Application Requirements

Applicants to all graduate programs at George Mason University must meet the admission standards and application requirements for graduate study as specified in Graduate Admissions. For information specific to the accelerated MAIS, see http://mais.gmu.edu/programs/la-mais-isin/application on the departmental web site.

Accelerated Option Requirements

While undergraduate students, accelerated master's students complete two graduate courses as indicated on their Accelerated Master's Program Application with a minimum grade of 3.00 in each course. Once admitted to the accelerated master's pathway, students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25 in all course work. Upon completion and conferral of the undergraduate degree in the semester indicated in the application, they submit the Bachelor's/Accelerated Master's Transition Form and are admitted to graduate status.

Select two from the following:6
Special Topics
Feminist Approaches to Social Research
Feminist Theories across the Disciplines
Women and Global Issues
Total Credits6

As graduate students, accelerated master's students have an advanced standing. They must meet all master's degree requirements except for the two courses (6 credits) they completed as undergraduates. Students must begin their master's program the semester immediately following conferral of the undergraduate degree.

Reserve Graduate Credit

Students may take up to 6 additional graduate credits as reserve graduate credit. These credits do not apply to the undergraduate degree. To apply these credits to the master's degree, students should use the Bachelor's/Accelerated Master's Transition Form.

Select 6 credits from the following:6
Special Topics
Feminist Approaches to Social Research
Feminist Theories across the Disciplines
Women and Global Issues
Total Credits6

The ability to take courses, including ones not listed above, for reserve graduate credit is available to all high achieving undergraduates with the permission of the department. Permission is normally granted only to qualified Mason seniors within 15 hours of graduation. See AP.1.4.4 Graduate Course Enrollment by Undergraduates.

Bachelor's Degree (selected)/Interdisciplinary Studies, Accelerated MAIS (Social Justice and Human Rights Concentration)

Overview

Highly-qualified undergraduates in select majors (listed below) may apply to the accelerated master's degree in interdisciplinary studies with a concentration in social justice and human rights. If accepted, and depending on their undergraduate major, students will be able to earn an undergraduate degree in their chosen major and a master's in interdisciplinary studies with a concentration in social justice and human rights after satisfactory completion of 150 credits, sometimes within five years.

For more detailed information, see AP.6.7 Bachelor's/Accelerated Master's Degrees. For policies governing all graduate degrees, see AP.6 Graduate Policies.

Selected Majors

Anthropology, Environmental and Sustainability Studies, Sociology, English, History, Philosophy, Conflict Analysis and Resolution, Psychology, Government and International Politics, Integrative Studies, and Communication.

Application Requirements

Applicants to all graduate programs at George Mason University must meet the admission standards and application requirements for graduate study as specified in Graduate Admissions. For information specific to the accelerated MAIS, see Application Requirements and Deadlines on the departmental web site.

Accelerated Option Requirements

While undergraduate students, accelerated master's students complete INTS 540 Contemporary Issues in Social Justice Human Rights and one course chosen from the list of electives for the MAIS concentration in social justice and human rights as indicated on their Accelerated Master's Program Application with a minimum grade of 3.00 in each course. Once admitted to the accelerated master's pathway, students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25 in all course work. Upon completion and conferral of the undergraduate degree in the semester indicated in the application, they submit the Bachelor's/Accelerated Master's Transition Form and are admitted to graduate status.

As graduate students, accelerated master's students have an advanced standing. They must meet all master's degree requirements except for the two courses (6 credits) they completed as undergraduates. Students must begin their master's program the semester immediately following conferral of the undergraduate degree.

Reserve Graduate Credit

Students may take up to 6 additional graduate credits as reserve graduate credit (chosen from the list of electives for the MAIS concentration in social justice and human rights). These credits do not apply to the undergraduate degree. The ability to take courses for reserve graduate credit is available to all high achieving undergraduates with the permission of the program. Permission to take a graduate course for reserve graduate credit is normally granted only to Mason seniors within 15 hours of graduation. See AP.1.4.4 Graduate Course Enrollment by Undergraduates.

Select up to 6 credits from the list of electives for the MAIS concentration in social justice and human rights6
Total Credits6